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Travel Essentials

Estonia Threats to Safety and Security

The information below has been excerpted from the following: 1) the US Department of State's "International Travel" website (travel.state.gov/travel/), 2) the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade's "Smartraveller" website (www.smartraveller.gov.au), and 3) the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office's "Foreign Travel Advice" website (www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/). Additional information is available from these sources. World Trade Press annually assesses the information presented on this page.

Australia: Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade Travel Advice

Terrorism

Terrorism is a threat throughout the world. You can find more information about this threat in our General advice to Australian travellers.

There is an ongoing threat of terrorism in Europe. In the past, terrorist attacks have occurred in a number of European cities.

Civil unrest/political tension

Although civil unrest is generally not a problem in Estonia, you should avoid demonstrations and large public gatherings as they may turn violent.

United States: Department of State International Travel Information

Estonian authorities are vigilant in combating terrorism and other threats to security. There have been no incidents of terrorism directed toward U.S. citizens in Estonia. Furthermore, civil unrest is rarely a problem in Estonia. Nevertheless, large public gatherings and demonstrations may occur on occasion in response to political issues; these generally proceed without incident. If you hear of or encounter a demonstration, you should avoid the area and check local media for updates on the situation. You can also contact the U.S. Embassy in Tallinn for current information.

Estonia is quite dark during the winter months (roughly October through April), and Estonian law requires pedestrians to wear small reflectors, which people generally pin to their coats or handbags. Although this law is rarely enforced in cities, reflectors are very important in rural areas where it may be difficult for motorists to see pedestrians. Violators of this law may be subject to a fine of around US$50 or a higher fine up to around US$500 if the pedestrian is under the influence of alcohol. Reflectors are inexpensive and you should be able to find them at many supermarkets, kiosks, and other shops.

To stay connected:

  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program so we can keep you up to date with important safety and security announcements.
  • Follow the Bureau of Consular Affairs on Twitter and Facebook as well.
  • Bookmark the Bureau of Consular Affairs website, which contains the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts as well as the Worldwide Caution.
  • Follow the U.S. Embassy in Estonia by visiting the Embassy’s website.
  • In the event of an emergency, contact us at 1-888-407-4747 toll-free within the United States and Canada, or via a regular toll line, 1-202-501-4444, from other countries.
  • Take some time before traveling to consider your personal security and checking for useful tips for traveling safely abroad.
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